Did you know floods are one of the most common types of natural disasters? Or in 2015, floods caused more deaths and destruction of property than any other natural disaster? Floods affect us all – no neighborhood, community, state, or region is immune to their threat. To help build flood resilience, the DHS Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) developed its Flood Apex program, which is aimed to create a decision support system-of-systems for community risk assessment and resilience planning. The Flood Apex will culminate in the development of the National Flood Decision Support Toolbox, which will help users in making crucial decisions before, during, and after events.


S&T wants your insights on how to best enhance community protection, flood impact mitigation, flood response, and community recovery. Getting to the bottom of the issues starts with you. By participating, you're helping ensure that the National Flood Decision Support Toolbox is the best it can be.


Share Your Flood Story

If you've lived through a flood, what can you share with others to help them become more resilient?


Share Your Insights on Flood Resilience

What do you think needs to be addressed in the areas of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery? How? By whom?


Questions? Contact us at email!


PLEASE NOTE: This is an unclassified, public facing website that will include a participation from a wide range of stakeholders, including industry, academia, state, local, tribal and territorial governments and foreign government partners. Information that is discussed or posted on the Collaboration site must be non-sensitive, and appropriate for the aforementioned audience. As with any open forum, please remember that on the Collaboration site you should not discuss or post sensitive technical, classified, for official use only, export-controlled, proprietary, trade secret or privacy information. The disclosure of critical or sensitive information poses a risk even if it is reasonably expected that it is already available in the public domain.

Photo credit: Digital_Third_Eye via Foter.com / CC BY-ND


Share Your Insights on Flood Resilience!

Alert & Warning Solutions

The alert and warning problems raised yet again in the latest S&T National Conversation cannot be fully addressed without infrastructure modernization. Our 10+ year study and technical feasibility efforts showed that ‘smart’ alert and warning devices are key, and the only practical path to the required performance, precision, flexibility and reliability. This ‘smart’ tech can deliver (not just issue but cause people ...more »

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Share Your Insights on Flood Resilience!

Ad Hoc Open Communication in Disaster war Impacted Areas.

Utilizing inexpensive easily configure Wifi devices delivered via lighter than air transport and configured to accept connections from all WiFi enabled devices set up ad-hoc network communications for access by the public. To solicit help or situational reports.

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Share Your Flood Story!

Unprecendented Flash Flooding in Historic Ellicott City, MD

On Saturday, July 30, 2016, the small town of Ellicott City experienced a severe flash flood that killed two people and damaged many of the town's historic downtown core and destroyed hundreds of vehicles. The rapid onset of the flood caught many residents and visitors by surprise, and according to several residents, was the worst they had ever seen. The National Weather Service reported that over 6 inches of rain fell ...more »

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Share Your Flood Story!

Turn Around Don't Drown

While I personally haven't experienced the negative consequences of a major flood, I have encountered several instances of flooded roads that forced me to turn around. The most recent encounter I had was while I was driving along the California coast in search of a restaurant, and came upon a road that was flooded with water. While the thought of driving through the water did cross my mind, I remembered that it doesn't ...more »

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Share Your Flood Story!

Austin Texas Flash Flood Alley

I have lived in the Austin, Texas are now since 1995. In that time if have witnessed many times why this part of Central Texas is referred to as Flash Flood Alley. For at least 100 miles North and South of Austin along IH 35 the residents have had to adjust to prolonged periods of drought interrupted by torrential rainfall and flash floods. It is a way of life here.

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Share Your Flood Story!

Emergency Alerts and a Flooded Train Station

Last night while commuting on metro, I (and everyone else on my train platform) received a wireless emergency alert about flash flooding that could occur in the area. I was preoccupied thinking about the WEA system, and how it was kind of neat to see everyone on the platform get the message, and then two minutes later see everyone on the arriving train receive it as their train came out of the tunnel and they had access ...more »

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Lesson in timely evacuation: Katrina

My husband and I are shrimpers from Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, where we have lived for over 40 years. It is the last town on the east bank of the Mississippi River before it hits the Gulf of Mexico. I remember watching the weather news about the approaching storm. I remember packing all the pictures and placing them in garbage bags securing them on top of my dresser and chest of drawers. Also, the fishermen were ...more »

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Long-Term Preparedness

We moved into a non-flood plain area in 1988. Back yard is a bit of a bowl, with heavy downpours pooling near the back door. Early on, I'd be out there with a broom in the worst part of a thunderstorm, pushing water around the corner of the house. Later added gutters, to divert water from the roof. The came the French Drain, in an effort to stop the broom-work. After a few years, the access to the drain had grown ...more »

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